Writers Worth Three: The Three T’s

What’s this? A third  week of Writers Worth? Darn skippy! It’s thanks to all of you that we can continue helping our own improve how they handle business and how they view their own value. So thank you to everyone whose posts are appearing here and everyone whose comments add to the experience.

Let me tell you a little something about Wade Finnegan. Wade is one of those people you meet in the stratosphere who’s instantly friendly, immediately supportive, and entirely genuine. You can’t help but like Wade. He makes you look good while he’s really the one who’s to be applauded. I credit a fairly large part of my new readership to Wade’s efforts. He’s the first one to promote my blog posts, anyone’s blog posts, and he’s generous of his time and talent in the comments.

And he says I inspire him. Wade, you’ve no idea how much you inspire me. 
Wade takes on today’s topic: defining worthiness in three simple steps.

The Three T’s of Worthiness
by Wade Finnegan

Talent- The
ability to manipulate words that informs, persuades, or entertains an audience
is a real talent. Taking ideas and turning them into useful and readable
documents is a job worth significant compensation. Anytime someone suggests
that writing is easy, hand him or her your laptop and say go for it! Chances
are they won’t get very far.
Thought- Writing
is thinking. The true work in writing is not visible to the naked eye. Writing
causes stress on the brain, the most powerful organ in your body, and leaves
you feeling exhausted when finished. The whole writing process is based upon a
labor of the mind. So if anyone ever suggests that writing isn’t “real” work,
have him or her crank out 1200 words in an hour, and tell them they will be
judged on the quality. Your thoughts are a commodity worthy of an income.
Tact- Words
possess unlimited power. They need to be treated with the decisiveness and
delicacy of a bomb technician. Writers deliver their message with a subtle refinement,
and truly manipulate words into meaning. A writer is a great observer of
humanity and understands how clear communication is an essential ingredient to
the human condition. The next time someone states, “Everyone is a writer.” have
them describe an ocean to a person who has never seen one, or inspire somebody
to make a life change. When they are at a loss, remind them this is why you
make the big bucks.
Being a professional means being treated as such. I wouldn’t
go to a massage therapist or a barber and not expect to pay them for their
service. They are professionals that provide a service that I cannot do on my
own. I provide a service that most people can’t complete on their own. This is
why I deserve fair compensation and feel no remorse in asking to be paid.
Wade Finnegan is a
freelance writer based in Oregon City, Oregon. He takes pride in beating
deadlines and exceeding his clients and editors expectations. He has expertise
in outdoor recreation and education, but writes on a wide array of subjects.
You can follow him on twitter @qualitywriting or find him posting on Google+.

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Comments

  • Cathy Miller May 29, 2012 at 12:50 pm

    Right on, Wade. And another T I find in writers – tenacity. We're like bulldogs. 🙂

    Reply
  • Kimberly Ben May 29, 2012 at 1:07 pm

    Nicely done, Wade. I love this statement: "The whole writing process is based upon a labor of the mind."

    Reply
  • Sharon Hurley Hall May 29, 2012 at 1:32 pm

    Love this, Wade. I especially like the point about the creative process.

    Reply
  • Devon Ellington May 29, 2012 at 2:48 pm

    Absolutely correct, Wade. I'm sick and tired of us expecting to put out for free. We have unique skills — they deserve fair compensation.

    Reply
  • Wade Finnegan May 29, 2012 at 2:57 pm

    First off, thank you Lori for dedicating time and space to #writersworthweek. I really, truly admire the way you give back to the writing community and I'm humbled by your kind words.

    Cathy- Find that inner bulldog and take it head-on. I love your attitude and I'm very thankful for your willingness to share.

    Kimberly- The mental part of writing is a lot of dang work and many people dismiss it because they can't see it. Thanks for the comment and I'm glad you enjoyed the post.

    Sharon- Thank you. The process we develop as writers is uniquely ours and is something to be valued.

    Devon- Listening to you over these last few months has helped me to develop this attitude. Thanks for your encouragement and being a voice for writers everywhere.

    Reply
  • Linda F. May 29, 2012 at 3:32 pm

    Great insights, Wade!

    Reply
  • Paula May 29, 2012 at 3:52 pm

    Nicely done, Wade!

    The one 'T' I think some people forget about it Tact. I'm so glad you pointed out why that's important, too.

    Reply
  • Wade Finnegan May 29, 2012 at 4:07 pm

    Thank you Linda, so great to see you here.

    I respect the power of words Paula and I know you do too. Thanks for the comment and sharing with others.

    Reply
  • Jake P May 29, 2012 at 4:55 pm

    Terrific perspective, Wade. 🙂

    Reply
  • Wade Finnegan May 29, 2012 at 6:01 pm

    Thanks Jake, I appreciate it.

    Reply
  • Samar May 29, 2012 at 7:51 pm

    Great post Wade!

    Especially love this line: "So if anyone ever suggests that writing isn’t “real” work, have him or her crank out 1200 words in an hour, and tell them they will be judged on the quality."

    Definitely going to be quoting it the next time someone says writing is easy or not real work.

    Reply
  • Wade Finnegan May 29, 2012 at 10:24 pm

    Thanks Samar, I appreciate the kind words. When I wrote it I felt a little snarky, but it is so true. I suppose it stems from the fact that everyone has wrote a school paper or responded to something online.

    I can change the oil in my car and fix a flat tire, but I don't believe I'm a mechanic. Writing is one of those activities that all of use do, but seldom realize what efforts it takes to write well.

    Reply
  • Gabriella F. May 29, 2012 at 10:51 pm

    Wow, well said, Wade. I was totally nodding my head on these two sentences:

    "Writing causes stress on the brain, the most powerful organ in your body, and leaves you feeling exhausted when finished."

    "Words possess unlimited power. They need to be treated with the decisiveness and delicacy of a bomb technician."

    How persuasive against those who so often say a monkey could do what we do. Bravo!

    Reply
  • Wade Finnegan May 29, 2012 at 11:35 pm

    Thanks Gabriella, even though I feel like a monkey sometimes when I'm pounding on these keys. 🙂

    Reply
  • Lori June 4, 2012 at 11:06 am

    Wade, you took an economy of words and packed them with so much punch it's tough to pull out just one terrific point. Thanks again, friend!

    Reply